North America

 

Here you can find all GA repaints for the North American Region

 

313 files

  1. textures for alphasim's FSX sabre. textures for the restored sabre N68388 owned by Ben Hall (USA)


    262 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated



  2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrPafNtGvNo


    THIS IS A NEW FULL VERSION, IF YOU HAD THE FILE NAMED OZx_Goose_HD_v1.00.zip AND YOU WANT TO UPDATE, PLEASE GO HERE TO DOWNLOAD.

    WARNING!! IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT YOU BACKUP YOUR OLD DEFAULT GOOSE, AS THE OZX GRUMMAN GOOSE HD REDUX WILL OVERWRITE CERTAIN FILES IN YOUR DEFAULT FOLDERS.

    The Grumman Goose first took to the skies in 1936 during the golden years of aviation and was immortalised in the TV series "Tales of the Gold Monkey". Within the sim fraternity there have been a number of addon versions of this classic aeroplane and Microsoft's rendition of this rare and famous aircraft leapt into our simulated skies towards the end of 2006 with the release of the final version of their long running simulator series - FSX.

    The Grumman Goose itself is extremely rare with only 345 airframes produced. There are approximately 60 remaining in service throughout the world today and the number of pilots with endorsements on this type are few and far between. We have been lucky enough to have access to a pilot who has flown the Goose and has been able to assist with our remodelling of the aircraft's performance files.
    The Goose has proven extremely versatile and has seen operational service as a freighter, passenger transport, military transport and even as a flying yacht installed with bars and toilets. It has held roles with Army, Airforce, Navy, Coastguard and has served around the far flung, four corners of the world.

    Microsoft's model of the G21A Grumman Goose has been a sleeper; well received in certain quarters but providing generally ho-hum graphics and flight model. It had a bland interior and was crying out for some high quality paints. When the team at AussieX started investigating this aircraft for our HD Redux treatment it was also discovered that the performance files for this bird were derived from an assortment of different Goose models; a lot of fine tuning was going to be required to get this bird to behave as close to the real life aircraft as possible.

    We think we have succeeded with this ambitious tasking. We offer two different models of the Goose - the original model with 450hp Pratt & Whitney radials and an uprated version dubbed the 'HP' (High Performance) with more powerful 650hp engines. Both models have had significant performance tweaking to make them behave as much as possible like their real life counterparts. In addition to this remodelling of the flight characteristics we have overhauled the interior of the aircraft with high resolution virtual cockpits. Engine gauges have been recalibrated for both engine models of our Goose and there are a number of different virtual cockpits available in our aircraft.

    Finally we have provided six high-definition paint schemes for this aircraft in both 450hp and HP-650hp versions. These 4096 pixel textures include every rivet, screw, dent and panel-line hand placed on normal, specular and diffusion texture maps. What this means for you the pilot is a gorgeous rendition of the metal framed G21 Goose just waiting to grace your monitor with realism and authenticity.

    Please take the time to download our freeware update to this rare and beautiful aircraft and let us know how much you enjoy her by posting your screenshots and stories.

    22,639 downloads

    6 comments

    Updated

  3. This is the the bonus pack to add the A2A/Shockwave Lights to the Goose, you must own the original A2A/Shockwave pack for this to work. This file is a self-installer that will overwrite your original configuration file, so please before installing this make a BACKUP of your existing aircraft.cfg

    2,421 downloads

    1 comment

    Submitted

  4. This is the update for v1.00 to v1.20; updated are, FME's, bump map textures, sounds and some panels in the HP versions.

    4,560 downloads

    1 comment

    Updated

  5. A repaint for the A2A Piper Cub, showing N38365
    Repaint by Jan Kees Blom

    1,187 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  6. A repaint for the A2A J-3 Cub, representing N26197 "Airship Squadron 32"
    Repaint by Jan Kees Blom

    1,069 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  7. 0 comments

    Updated

  8. A repaint for the A2A Piper Cub. The aircraft re[resented is a homebuilt version of the Piper Cub, by David Henderson, who called it 'Little Bear'
    At present, this aircraft is with the Tango Squadron in Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Repaint by Jan Kees Blom.

    1,331 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  9. This repaint of the A2A Piper J-3 Cub is based on the real word aircraft N187A9 which is a Super Cub used as a shuttle for the exclusive Ultima Thule resort in Alaska. The standard version of this repaint comes in a used and dirty look. Clean replacement textures for those who love their aircraft in a more pristine condition are also included.


    2,780 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  10. A repaint for the A2A Cessna 172 Skyhawk in the colors of N734BW, a C172 flying with Airwolf Aviation Services, from KGMU, Greenvlle, SC, USA. Repaint by Jan Kees Blom, based on the paintkit by A2A

    112 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  11. Fictional weather beaten DC-2 of Buffalo Airways for the amazing Uiver DC2X. See the read me attached for installation instructions.

    Updated 4 April 2010 - V2.0 more minor adjustments, added extended colour to engine cowling, Curtiss-Wright engines logo on tail fin, Canadian Flag next to registration etc..

    Happy Flying,
    Archie.

    1,837 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  12. Hello again!

    Updated 9 February 2010 - Took the green strip off the top of the fuselage and added the black 'cheat line' along each side. You will need to delete the old Buffalo C185 and reinstall this new one, I have changed the main bmps to dds format and included all necessary files, so no copy and paste required.

    Here is another repaint in my series of Buffalo Airways fictional paints. This one is for the wonderful Carenado C185F Skywagon, just the thing for exploring the PNW!. She is a little beat up and weathered, and Arnie, Buffalo's Chief Pilot, is at the controls.

    Enjoy your flight,
    Archie.

    1,978 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  13. Here is another of my fictional Buffalo paints, this time for the Carenado Seneca.

    See Readme for installation instructions!

    Enjoy your flight!

    Archie

    1,046 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  14. Here is another fictional repaint in my Buffalo Airways series, this time for the fantastic Aerosoft Twin Otter. I'm no painter, and this is a little rough, but she has a lot of character! There are a few little details that need to be fixed up, but I just don't have a lot of time at the moment for repainting, so I may release a version 2 down the track when I can get back to it.

    Install instruction in the read me file.

    Happy Flying,
    Archie.

    1,373 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  15. Well, I consider this one of the best paints I've done so far.

    There are more hours of work in this paint than I want to admit. I first saw this bird in the War Museum in Ho Chi Mihn City, Vietnam, some 6 or 7 years back and have been back on a number of occassions and photographed it.
    I visited it again, a month ago and at the same time, Carenado were releasing the 185F as one of their continuing Cessna range.

    When I got home, I got to painting it. I decided that I'd spend some time on this one, so I did my research and turned up all sorts of things. This tempted me to go deeper and I ended up painting the interior to the 1969 era as well as dressing the pilot (complete with moustache) in dress of the day, 1969 USAF flying overalls, flying jacket, cap and shoes.

    The interior was painted as per the USAF light aircraft paint schemes of 1969 with green primer dashboard, interior fuselage and roof.
    Fascia panel was painted in a blue primer finish as well and the whole interior has been stressed and marked to give it a weathered "feel".

    It's not perfect and I'm still learning, so excuse some of the imperfections.

    All of the main texture sheets have been increased in size for enhancement purposes, so it is a rather large file, 35Mb, so be warned that the download could take a while.

    It's a perfect aircraft for PNW as a lot of bushies know, so she won't look out of place flying around the countryside over there.

    Installation is via the Readme file included in the zip. Please read it carefully as you need to also add the thumbnail so that it shows up properly in your FSX opening screen.

    Hope you enjoy it,


    Kind Regards,


    Frank Cooper

    1,485 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  16. Lionheart's Epic Victory C-ACAP Canadian North Corporate Charter Livery (Fictional)
    This Lionheart's Epic Victory livery is specifically manufactured for the Lionheart's Epic Victory VLJ Mini Biz Jet for FSX.
    This livery is of C-ACAP Canadian North Corporate Charter, manufactured by Epic Aircraft Corporation. This aircraft is classified as a VLJ type aircraft, short for 'Very Light Jet".
     

    506 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  17. A repaint for the Cessna Bird Dog by Sibwings.
    This plane is privately owned and the paint is very unique.
    Repaint by Magnus Almgren

    281 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  18. A repaint for the Cessna Bird Dog by Sibwings.
    Privately owned N19YM - Florida / USA
    Repaint by Magnus Almgren

    375 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  19. A repaint for the Cessna Bird Dog by Sibwings.

    This is the dirty and worn version of the N68VN - as it would have been under the Vietnam war.

    This paint was requested by Ken Peoples, Phoenix - USA.
    The plane is owned and flown by retired USMC Colonel Landon K. Thorne. He was an back seat air observer in the Vietnam war flying the Bird Dog for the Marines.
    Col. Thorne helped us with sending detailed pictures of the N68VN.

    Repaint by Magnus Almgren

    454 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  20. A repaint for the Cessna Bird Dog by Sibwings.

    This paint was requested by Ken Peoples, Phoenix - USA.
    The plane is owned and flown by retired USMC Colonel Landon K. Thorne. He was an back seat air observer in the Vietnam war flying the Bird Dog for the Marines.
    Col. Thorne helped us with sending detailed pictures of the N68VN.

    Repaint by Magnus Almgren

    272 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  21. This is a repaint for the Sibwing Bird Dog.
    It is a Ravens Bird Dog that was flewn by Major Richard H DeFer aka "Dick". He unfortunately was killed in action on the 18th of October 1971 by enemy ground fire after have crash landed in enemy territory.

    About the Ravens - written by Ed Gunter:

    During the course of American history, there have been many covert military operations. None, however, reached the scope or intensity of the war in Laos during the Viet Nam era. The backbone of this war were the Ravens-Forward Air Controllers (FACs) who flew small, slow propeller driven airplanes. The mission of the Ravens was to support indigenous forces in Laos in their fight against invading forces from North Vietnam.

    The Ravens were all volunteers who had previous experience as FACs in South Viet Nam. Due to international treaties, the Ravens were "divorced" from the USAF. They wore only civilian clothes, and operated out of generally small fields at different sites in the Kingdom of Laos. They had cover stories to explain their presence in Laos, but I don't think anyone believed the stories other than USAF headquarters types. Most Ravens knew little or nothing about what they were volunteering for, other than it was classified, exciting, and was far removed from the bureaucratic battles and political rules of engagement in South Viet Nam.

    The Ravens used three different airplanes to accomplish their mission: the small, light O-1 observation aircraft, armed only with white phosphorous smoke rockets; the heavier, slightly faster U-17 (Cessna 185), with the same armament, but longer range and loiter time. Some Ravens got to check out in the "Cadillac"-the T-28. This was heaven for a Raven-bombs, napalm, high explosive rockets, and 50 caliber machine guns for strafe. Now, you didn't have to wait for jets when you had a fast-moving target. The common denominator was that they all flew low, slow, and were highly vulnerable to ground fire.

    The missions were as varied as the personalities of the Ravens. Some carried a "backseater"-a local who translated, talked to ground troops, and helped locate targets. Others were essentially deep interdiction missions-aimed at stemming the flow of troops and supplies into this neutral country. Some were basic visual reconnaissance looking for targets. Many were "troops in contact"-providing life-saving tactical air strikes in support of ground troops being fired upon.

    Much has been written about the Ravens. The definitive work is probably "The Ravens" by Christopher Robbins, which is described later. After years of interviews and studies, he has painted a fairly accurate picture of one part of the Raven story. Some other comments are listed below. For a detailed story of the Ravens, order the book!

    Comments on the Ravens:

    The Ravens were a group of elite pilots who flew the Cessna O-1 Bird Dogs in Laos during the Southeast Asian Conflict. In slow, low flying aircraft the Ravens' job was to find the target, order up fighter-bombers, mark the target accurately with smoke rockets, control the operation and stay over the target to make a bomb damage assessment. The name Ravens became a symbol of intelligence gathering and aerial control of ground combat. (Half-time announcement Raven presentation at USAF Academy, Nov. 4, 1989)
    They went to war in blue jeans, T-shirts, and sometimes cowboy hats. It was a symbol of their disdain for the conventional, "bureaucratic" military. They were the Ravens, fighting a secret air war in the jungles of Laos, almost forgotten by everyone... (San Antonio Light, Oct., 1987)
    The pilots, known as Ravens, are unique because they were among some 130 Air Force pilots who volunteered to risk their lives to fly highly dangerous covert missions in unarmed single engine Cessna O-1s. They were part of what was known as the Steve Canyon program, which was created in 1966... Their job as FACs was to locate and call in airstrikes against the North Vietnamese during its occupation of Laos... They (the enemy) knew that if they shot down a fighter there would be more fighters coming. So, they shot down the air controllers. It was dangerous because you were flying a prop airplane, low over the jungle, looking for the enemy. And if you found him and they didn't shoot you down, then they were going to get blown away. Christopher Robbins said some 30% of the unit died from combat injuries. (San Antonio Express-News, Oct. 26, 1987)
    Locked away in classified archives until now... They...suffered the highest casualty rate in the Indochina war. Their deeds were the stuff of whispered legends. The pilots who flew the fighter-bombers to enemy targets knew them as the Ravens. (Crown Publishers, press release)
    On occasion they went trolling; skimming the treetops above enemy positions in the hopes of drawing fire... The elite group of men, part adventurers/ part patriots, who flew some of the most bizarre missions of the Viet Nam war. They were a small group (their ranks were never more than 22 at any one time) performing a hazardous mission. (Military Book Club review, Jan., 1988)
    The best and the brightest, the craziest and the bravest Americans served in Laos, none braver than the men who flew in Combat as FACs known as Ravens...braving bad weather, tricky terrain, combat fatigue, poor maintenance, and occasional assassination teams to get the job done... To give you some sense of the size of the war in Laos, the United States dropped 1.6 million tons of bombs there- more than the 1.36 million tons it dropped on Germany during World War II. (Book review, Asa Baber, Chicago Sun-Times, Nov. 22, 1987)

    Now, order the book "The Ravens", & learn the story!

    Ed Gunter

    246 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  22. This is a repaint for the Sibwing Bird Dog.
    It is a Ravens Bird Dog 0-72897 that was flewn by (Maybe not 100% historical correct) Dunc Duncan.

    About the Ravens - written by Ed Gunter:

    During the course of American history, there have been many covert military operations. None, however, reached the scope or intensity of the war in Laos during the Viet Nam era. The backbone of this war were the Ravens-Forward Air Controllers (FACs) who flew small, slow propeller driven airplanes. The mission of the Ravens was to support indigenous forces in Laos in their fight against invading forces from North Vietnam.

    The Ravens were all volunteers who had previous experience as FACs in South Viet Nam. Due to international treaties, the Ravens were "divorced" from the USAF. They wore only civilian clothes, and operated out of generally small fields at different sites in the Kingdom of Laos. They had cover stories to explain their presence in Laos, but I don't think anyone believed the stories other than USAF headquarters types. Most Ravens knew little or nothing about what they were volunteering for, other than it was classified, exciting, and was far removed from the bureaucratic battles and political rules of engagement in South Viet Nam.

    The Ravens used three different airplanes to accomplish their mission: the small, light O-1 observation aircraft, armed only with white phosphorous smoke rockets; the heavier, slightly faster U-17 (Cessna 185), with the same armament, but longer range and loiter time. Some Ravens got to check out in the "Cadillac"-the T-28. This was heaven for a Raven-bombs, napalm, high explosive rockets, and 50 caliber machine guns for strafe. Now, you didn't have to wait for jets when you had a fast-moving target. The common denominator was that they all flew low, slow, and were highly vulnerable to ground fire.

    The missions were as varied as the personalities of the Ravens. Some carried a "backseater"-a local who translated, talked to ground troops, and helped locate targets. Others were essentially deep interdiction missions-aimed at stemming the flow of troops and supplies into this neutral country. Some were basic visual reconnaissance looking for targets. Many were "troops in contact"-providing life-saving tactical air strikes in support of ground troops being fired upon.

    Much has been written about the Ravens. The definitive work is probably "The Ravens" by Christopher Robbins, which is described later. After years of interviews and studies, he has painted a fairly accurate picture of one part of the Raven story. Some other comments are listed below. For a detailed story of the Ravens, order the book!

    Comments on the Ravens:

    The Ravens were a group of elite pilots who flew the Cessna O-1 Bird Dogs in Laos during the Southeast Asian Conflict. In slow, low flying aircraft the Ravens' job was to find the target, order up fighter-bombers, mark the target accurately with smoke rockets, control the operation and stay over the target to make a bomb damage assessment. The name Ravens became a symbol of intelligence gathering and aerial control of ground combat. (Half-time announcement Raven presentation at USAF Academy, Nov. 4, 1989)
    They went to war in blue jeans, T-shirts, and sometimes cowboy hats. It was a symbol of their disdain for the conventional, "bureaucratic" military. They were the Ravens, fighting a secret air war in the jungles of Laos, almost forgotten by everyone... (San Antonio Light, Oct., 1987)
    The pilots, known as Ravens, are unique because they were among some 130 Air Force pilots who volunteered to risk their lives to fly highly dangerous covert missions in unarmed single engine Cessna O-1s. They were part of what was known as the Steve Canyon program, which was created in 1966... Their job as FACs was to locate and call in airstrikes against the North Vietnamese during its occupation of Laos... They (the enemy) knew that if they shot down a fighter there would be more fighters coming. So, they shot down the air controllers. It was dangerous because you were flying a prop airplane, low over the jungle, looking for the enemy. And if you found him and they didn't shoot you down, then they were going to get blown away. Christopher Robbins said some 30% of the unit died from combat injuries. (San Antonio Express-News, Oct. 26, 1987)
    Locked away in classified archives until now... They...suffered the highest casualty rate in the Indochina war. Their deeds were the stuff of whispered legends. The pilots who flew the fighter-bombers to enemy targets knew them as the Ravens. (Crown Publishers, press release)
    On occasion they went trolling; skimming the treetops above enemy positions in the hopes of drawing fire... The elite group of men, part adventurers/ part patriots, who flew some of the most bizarre missions of the Viet Nam war. They were a small group (their ranks were never more than 22 at any one time) performing a hazardous mission. (Military Book Club review, Jan., 1988)
    The best and the brightest, the craziest and the bravest Americans served in Laos, none braver than the men who flew in Combat as FACs known as Ravens...braving bad weather, tricky terrain, combat fatigue, poor maintenance, and occasional assassination teams to get the job done... To give you some sense of the size of the war in Laos, the United States dropped 1.6 million tons of bombs there- more than the 1.36 million tons it dropped on Germany during World War II. (Book review, Asa Baber, Chicago Sun-Times, Nov. 22, 1987)

    Now, order the book "The Ravens", & learn the story!

    Ed Gunter

    307 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  23. A repaint of Carenado's C185F Bush X Tundra and Float variants in the colours of N9916.

    1,675 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  24. A repaint of Carenado's C185F Bush X Tundra, Ski and Amphibian variants in the colours of C-FRRK.

    893 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  25. A repaint of Carenado's C185F Bush X Tundra and Amphibian variants in the colours of C-FBZP.

    1,136 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated